Why Should we donate blood?

Blood donation gives, a proud feeling of touching someone’s life in such a beautiful way. Its an experience that no words can define. You have to donate blood yourself to find out. By keeping the blood line flowing, you will greatly contribute towards a healthier, happier society. Do remember, any one may require blood any time including ourselves and our dear ones. You also benefit in other ways by donating blood. It reduces the chances of ischemic heart diseases (beginning of heart problems) as frequent donations reduce the accumulated and unwanted cholesterol from the body. Your blood donation will also get you your blood assurance from us.

Any side effects of blood donation?

Absoluteltely no. Some donors may feel  slight dizziness which will disappear after a few minutes rest..

If I get any disease by blood donation?

That is impossible. Only sterile disposables are used to collect your blood. These disposables can be used only one time. This totally eliminates any remote chance of catching any disease from blood donation.

How much blood can I donate?

Eligible donors (any body between 18 to 60 years of age and leading a healthy life) with weight above 45 kgs can donate 350- 450 ml of blood. Your body can replenish this volume within 24 hours.

Why should I become a regular blood donor?

As you know, blood is a life saving medicine, which works wonders in certain medical treatments, and life threatening situations. It is an emergency medicine. Our society is today threatened by scarcity of blood. The only source of blood right now is human being.

This issue has got further complicated by professional donors, who donate blood for money. These donors have contributed towards rapid spread of killer diseases like AIDS, Hepatitis B & Hepatitis C in the society. WHO strongly recommends the source of blood as only from a regular voluntary blood donor. Your regular donation will go a long way in salvaging the situation.

What should I eat before blood donation?

Anything, but preferably something. Eating light snacks and a drink (non alcoholic) before blood donation makes you psychologically more comfortable.

What exactly happens during blood donation?

Giving blood is a very simple and straight forward process. On arrival at a blood drive, you will be asked to fill a few details on a donor form. Your medical history will be taken by a medical personnel in an area which provides adequate privacy. We routinely take a small drop of blood to ensure that you aren't anemic. After you pass this simple medical screening process, you will be escorted to a blood donation area. The actual blood donation takes about 10 minutes followed by a little rest and refreshments.

What happens to blood that I donate?

Your blood goes to a modern blood bank - IMA Blood Bank. Within 6 hours of Blood collection its processing starts at IMA Blood Bank. It is separated into components viz. Red Cells, Plasma & Platelets. These Blood components are made available to Govt hospitals and Private hospitals which do not have blood storage facilities, send their samples to us for cross matching following which blood is sent to them directly. All this is to ensure fastest response to the patient’s need. This is how each time you donate blood you save up to 4 lives.

Why blood components?

In modern medicine there is no room for whole blood. Developed countries have switched over to blood components for more than 20 years. Unfortunately in India still 95% of the blood is used as whole blood. By making blood components, all the useful parts of blood can be used. In whole blood, platelets die and clotting factors become ineffective and the patient receives unwanted and ineffective components.

What you do for blood testing?

Automatic and highly sensitive Robotic blood testing set up is used to test each and every unit of blood for HIV Virus (AIDS), Hepatitis B & C virus (Jaundice) Malaria Parasite, Syphilis and also blood groups. Bar Code systems, fully integrated computer network, real time information processing makes our lab one of the best of its kind in India. This lab ensures highest level of blood safety to each unit of blood. Thanks to robotic machines the lab technicians also have minimal contact with the blood, which ensures their safety from blood transmitted disease.

What care should I take after donation?

Eat and Drinks something before leaving
Drink more liquids than usual in next 4 hours
Avoid consuming alcohol until you have eaten something
Don't smoke for next 30 minutes
Avoid climbing steps for next 30 minutes
If there is bleeding from the phlebotomy site, raise the arm and apply pressure
If fainting or dizziness occurs, either lie down or sit with the head between the knees
Resume all normal activities if no symptoms occur
Remove bandage next day

How Costs are met?

IMA Blood Bank is run on a “ Not for Profit” but self sustaining basis. There is a service charge levied on blood that is distributed. This service charge is essential for meeting cost of raw material, testing, processing, providing for depreciation and administration expenses. This will also give IMA Blood Bank an opportunity to undertake fundamental research in the field of transfusion medicine. Meanwhile to take care of people from poor economic status, all blood components issued to BPL card holders and Hemophiliacs are absolutely free of cost and for other economically weak patients substantial subsidy is given on recommendation of the treating doctor. IMA is committed to up lift the standards of blood banking and in turn the quality of life of the common man in our society.

Why Should I donate blood?

Blood Donation gives a great feeling of touching someone’s life in a beautiful way. It is an experience that no words can define. You have to donate blood to get this feeling and to gain this experience.


By keeping the blood line flowing, you will greatly contribute towards healthier, happier society. Do remember, any one may require blood anytime, including ourselves and our dear ones.


You also benefit in other ways by donating blood. It reduces the chances of Ischemic Heart Diseases (beginning of heart problems) as frequent donations reduce the accumulated and unwanted iron load and cholesterol from the body.


Your blood donation will also get you your blood assurance from us.

Can I get any disease like AIDS or Hepatitis or any other disease by blood donation?

This is impossible. Only sterile disposables are used to collect your blood at IMA Blood Bank. These disposables can be used only one time. This totally eliminates any chance of catching any disease from donating blood.

How much Blood can I donate?

Eligible donors (any body between 18 to 60 years of age and leading a healthy life) with weight above 45 kilograms can donate up to 350 ml and those washing more than 55 kgs can donate 450ml of Blood. Your body would replenish this volume in no time.

How frequently can I donate blood?

  • Men every 3 months
  • Women every 4 months

What should I eat after blood donation?

Drink some liquid like tea, cold drink, juice etc. to replenish fluid and eat some snacks. All this will be available for you at the blood donation site.

What does a blood bank do to my donation?

Your whole blood donation is separated into components like red cells, platelets etc., tests for any possible disease, store each component at optimum temperature separately and gives these to the needy patients after cross matching.

What happens to blood I donate?

Your blood goes to a modern blood bank- IMA Blood Bank. Within 6 hrs of blood collection its processing starts. It is separated into components viz. Red Cells, Plasma and Platelets.

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The blood components are then made available to patients in need admitted to various hospitals clinics. Each time you donate blood, you save up to 4 lives.

 

The donor sample undergoes mandatory tests for Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTI) Test for HIV like hepatitis etc. The units which are tested negative are labeled and stored at the appropriate storage conditions

What is risk behavior?

Risk behavior of a person exposes him/her to a high risk of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) including AIDS and causes fatal illnesses which are transmittable through blood. Such people are requested not to donate blood. Risk behavior includes people with following traits.


  • Unprotected sex
  • Sex outside marriage
  • Multiple sex partners
  • Sharing same needle for IV injections
  • Use of contaminated needles and its multiple use
  • Sharing personal utilities
  • Unsafe blood transfusion
  • Lack of awareness

What all things you test my blood for?

Automatic and highly sensitive Robotic blood testing set up is used to test each and every unit of blood for HIV Virus (AIDS), Hepatitis B & C virus (Jaundice), Malaria Parasites, Syphilis and also blood groups. Bar Code System, fully integrated computer network, real time information processing makes our lab one of the best in India. This lab ensures highest level of blood safety to each unit of blood. Thanks to robotic machines the lab technicians also have minimal contact with the blood, which ensures their safety from blood transmitted diseases.

What are rare blood groups?

Besides A, B, and Rh antigens occasionally some rare antigens can be present in the blood They are clinically not significant in normal conditions. However antibodies against some of these rare antigen may develop in case of multiple transfusions or during pregnancy/child birth. In such situations, blood group required has to be matched for rare antigens.

How is blood group tested?

Blood groups are tested using antigen-antibody reaction. For example, if a blood group A blood/red cells will agglutinate (form a clump), which might be confirmed under microscope.

A set of such reactions against antibody (reagent) to A, B and Rh confirms the blood group.

Who can safely receive which blood group?


  • Group A individuals can receive group A and group O red blood cells.
  • Groups B individuals can receive group B and group O red blood cells
  • Group AB can receive group AB, A.B and O red blood cells since group AB individuals can usually receive any of the four blood groups, and they are called “universal recipients” (AB positive).
  • Group O individuals can receive only group O blood. Since group O red blood cells can usually be given to group A, B, AB and O individuals, a donor with group O blood is referred to as a “universal donor” (O negative).

What is the Rh factor?

The “Rh factor” is the principal antigen of the Rh blood group system. It is also called the ‘D’ antigen. People whose red blood cells express the D antigens are Rh positive.

What is cross matching?

We have seen in the table earlier, who can donate or accept blood for whom.


Still, to ensure full safety, the patient’s and donor’s blood is incubated in a special micro-tube to check if donor red cell would be totally compatible to the recipient (patient).


Only compatible blood is used for transfusion to the patients.


What is an antibody?

These are protein molecules. Various types of antibodies are found in the body. Antibodies are normally present in plasma. These antibodies react against the antigen and are antigen specific.


In ABO blood group system a person would not have the antibody against the missing antigen (reciprocal antibody).


For example, a person with blood group A will not have antibody (anti-A) against antigen A in his blood. He would have anti-B antibody present in his blood.


What is Hemoglobin (HB)?

Hemoglobin is protein molecule, which contains iron. Hemoglobin is present in red blood cells of our blood. It is because of Hb, that our blood looks red. According to WHO, men should have 13-17 gm% and women 12-15gm% of hemoglobin.

Why is blood required?

Blood transfusion is primarily required for the conditions in which either blood or blood component is lost or destroyed to a dangerous level. Normally our body can tolerate blood loss to an extent of 20% or about 1.0 liter. But above that, blood has to be supplemented. So, conditions like , (Major Surgery,Accidents, Child birth, Some Infections) Cancer, Thalassemia, Hemophilia, Acute Anemia etc., may require blood.


Are there any risks in receiving transfusion?

As with any medical procedure, blood transfusions carry some risk. There is remote chance of receiving blood of the wrong type. In addition, several infectious diseases can be transmitted by blood transfusions if quality controls are not in place. Among the virus viruses that may be transmitted by blood are: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS; several Hepatitis viruses; Malaria; and Syphilis. IMA Blood bank follows absolute standards in blood collection, processing and distribution. Hence here the chances are highly negligible.


What steps are to be taken to reduce the risks involved in receiving a transfusion?

Steps to ensure maximum transfusion safety, involve both donor and recipient. Donors are screened very carefully, using a detailed questionnaire, for health problems or circumstances that increase risk of transmitting infection. After blood is drawn, it is tested for numerous viruses and other potentially harmful disease agents, and positive or doubtful units are discarded. Donor blood is tested for ABO, Rh and the presence of possibly dangerous blood group antibodies, as well. .


After the recipient’s blood is tested for ABO, Rh and the presence of blood group antibodies, donor units are selected of the same blood groups and cross matching is then performed to transfuse compatible blood.


What if I need Blood?

IMA Blood Bank provides blood without the precondition of “replacement” (replacement means where the family or friend has to donate blood at the blood bank to get equivalent number of units for their patient) unless it is in awful crisis.


You need to collect patient’s blood sample and treating doctor’s prescription for blood component when you visit IMA Blood Bank. If the requirement is urgent, you may please get it noted when you call IMA Blood Bank. If it is planned surgery and you need large volume, it may be issued in staggered manner after consulting your doctor. There is a small testing charge, which is levied to sustain the cost of operations.


If you are regular IMA Blood Bank donor or drive organizer you are covered by the donor assurance policy, which not only gives you priority over a non-donor, in some situations the testing charges are waived off. Your blood assurance coverage will increase with increased number of donations at IMA Blood Bank.

Do you pass subsidy to poor patients?

Yes, we do. Hemophiliacs, and all those holding BPL cards are given blood and components absolutly free. Whenever a doctor, who writes the prescription or the patient’s relative tell us about financial difficulty of the patient, appropriate subsidy is passed to the patient. Economically weaker families should present proof of identity. IMA Blood Bank every year issues blood components to poor patients worth 20-30 lakhs as free and discount.

Why blood Testing Charges?

IMA Blood Bank is a ‘Not for Profit’ but self sustaining organization. There is testing / service charge levied on blood that is distributed as stipulated by NBTC. The charges are essential for meeting cost of raw material, testing, processing, depreciation and administration expenses. Most of the equipment costs several lacs of rupees and needs periodical replacement. More over IMA Blood Bank provides Blood and components absolutely free to BPL card holders and Haemophilia patients, and subsidy to poor and needy patients on recommendation of the treating doctors. In addition it also organizes various Blood donation campaigns to ensure adequate stock of Blood and Components for which fund is required.

IMA Blood Bank Complex & Research Centre
P.O Ramavarmupuram
Thrissur – 680 631, Kerala, India.
Tel: +91 487 2323964, 2320999
Email: admin@imabloodbankthrissur.com
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